Donate
Buy
Tickets
Today's Hours
Blog Test

Blog Test

H.P. Lovecraft Visits the Poe Museum

Mark Sherman - Tuesday, August 23, 2016
[caption id="attachment_3332" align="alignright" width="600"]HP Lovecraft by Semtner HP Lovecraft by Semtner[/caption] Last Saturday, August 20, would have been the 126th birthday of H.P. Lovecraft (1890-1937), author of such influential horror, science fiction, and fantasy tales as The Call of Cthulhu, The Dunwich Horror, and At the Mountains of Madness (which was inspired by Poe's novel The Narrative of Arthur Gordon Pym). Lovecraft's influence on both horror fiction and popular culture has been vast. Several of his works have been adapted to film, music, and even games. In his tales of cosmic horror he created a shared fictional universe known as the Cthulhu Mythos, which continues to live on in the works of legions of later authors. Lovecraft was also a great admirer of Poe's works and devoted an entire chapter of his 1935 book Supernatural Horror in Literature to him. In that chapter, Lovecraft writes, Before Poe the bulk of weird writers had worked largely in the dark; without an understanding of the psychological basis of the horror appeal, and hampered by more or legs of conformity to certain empty literary conventions such as the happy ending, virtue rewarded, and in general a hollow moral didacticism, acceptance of popular standards and values, and striving of the author to obtrude his own emotions into the story and take sides with the partisans of the majority's artificial ideas. Poe, on the other hand, perceived the essential impersonality of the real artist; and knew that the function of creative fiction is merely to express and interpret events and sensations as they are, regardless of how they tend or what they prove -- good or evil, attractive or repulsive, stimulating or depressing, with the author always acting as a vivid and detached chronicler rather than as a teacher, sympathizer, or vendor of opinion. He saw clearly that all phases of life and thought are equally eligible as a subject matter for the artist, and being inclined by temperament to strangeness and gloom, decided to be the interpreter of those powerful feelings and frequent happenings which attend pain rather than pleasure, decay rather than growth, terror rather than tranquility, and which are fundamentally either adverse or indifferent to the tastes and traditional outward sentiments of mankind, and to the health, sanity, and normal expansive welfare of the species. Never a terribly famous writer during his lifetime, Lovecraft would likely not have been recognized by the staff when he visited the Poe Museum in Richmond in May 1929. On May 4, he wrote Elizabeth Toldridge, "In Richmond the chief object of interest for me is the Poe Shrine—an old stone house with two adjoining houses connected as wings & used as a storehouse of Poe reliques. Here I have spent much time examining the objects associated with my supreme literary favourite—to say nothing of the marvelous model of Richmond in 1820, housed in one of the wings." The Poe Museum's Old Stone House, Enchanted Garden, and model of Richmond remain much as they were in 1929, so today's guests can still feel much of the atmosphere that must have inspired Lovecraft during his visit. The following photographs date to about that time. [caption id="attachment_3333" align="alignright" width="600"]The Poe Museum in June 1929. The Poe Museum in June 1929.[/caption] [caption id="attachment_3334" align="alignright" width="600"]The Enchanted Garden in early spring of 1929. The Enchanted Garden in early spring of 1929.[/caption] [caption id="attachment_3335" align="alignright" width="600"]Elizabeth Arnold Poe Memorial Building in about 1928 Elizabeth Arnold Poe Memorial Building in about 1928[/caption] Lovecraft was not the only famous cultural figure to make a trip to the Poe Museum. Vincent Price, Salvador Dali, and Gertrude Stein also visited. Click their names to read about their Poe Museum experiences.
Comments
Post has no comments.
Post a Comment




Captcha Image

Trackback Link
http://www.poemuseum.org/BlogRetrieve.aspx?BlogID=21606&PostID=885715&A=Trackback
Trackbacks
Post has no trackbacks.