Donate
Buy
Tickets
Today's Hours
Blog Test

Blog Test

Rufus Griswold Visits the Conservator

Mark Sherman - Wednesday, July 20, 2016
[caption id="attachment_3260" align="alignright" width="600"]Griswold portraits at the conservation studio Griswold portraits at the conservation studio[/caption] The Poe Museum’s newly acquired portraits of Rufus and Caroline Griswold have just returned from a visit to a conservator who examined them so that he can put together a proposal for treating them. We will post that information when it becomes available. To find out more about these portraits, click here. The good news is that the paintings are in great shape. The bad news is that those great paintings are covered under layers of dirt, grime, and varnish. A quick examination revealed a little of what these paintings have endured over the past 176 years. [caption id="attachment_3261" align="alignright" width="600"]Rufus and Caroline Griswold meet George III at the conservation studio Rufus and Caroline Griswold meet George III at the conservation studio[/caption] The portraits were painted in 1840 when Rufus Griswold was twenty-five years old. Rufus and Caroline had married three years earlier, but he would leave her in New York in November 1840 in order to take a job in Philadelphia. She remained in New York, where she died just two years later. Griswold was devastated by her sudden death. He refused to leave her side until he was forced to do so by a relative thirty hours later. Then he returned to her crypt forty days later and spent the night with her corpse. The loss of Caroline inspired Griswold to write poetry in her memory. Among these were “Five Days” and “To Elizabeth Waring—A Christmas Epistle.” The manuscript for the latter is in the collection of Griswold’s letters and manuscripts included with the above portraits. The poem begins, A day of joy to all the world is this, But unto me, alas! A day of gloom; For she who was the fountain of my bliss Is hid from me forever in the tomb. “A happy Christmas!” comes from many a voice,-- ‘Tis kindly meant,--it brings me only pain,-- She who alone could bid my soul rejoice, Oh, wo is me! I ne’er shall see again!” But fifty days ago,--she by my side,-- I knew no pleasure which was not mine own,-- Ah, cruel Death!—to take from me my bride!— Thou hast the temple of my hopes o’erthrown. With broken heart, my weary way I wend, No stars henceforth upon my pathway shine,-- Alas, what stars like eyes of such a friend, As thou to me, oh, sainted Caroline! These portraits serve as a record of the young couple in the early years of their marriage. A year after this portrait was painted, Griswold met Edgar Allan Poe. Another year later, Griswold rose to literary fame with the publication of his anthology The Poets and Poetry of America. Poe faintly praised the book at first but later ridiculed it for placing too much emphasis on northern writers while overlooking southern poets. This was only the beginning of the literary feud that ended after Poe’s death with Griswold attacking him in print with a largely fabricated biography. The painting has been attributed to the artist Charles Loring Elliott in the 1943 book Rufus Wilmot Griswold: Poe’s Literary Executor by Joy Bayless. Griswold is known to have commissioned more portraits from him, so it is possible the Poe Museum’s portraits could be Elliott’s work. These paintings are, however, so dirty that it is difficult to tell what they really look like or who might have painted them. When Griswold died at the age of forty-two in 1857, his daughter Emily Griswold took ownership of the paintings. From her, they descended through her family until they arrived at the antique dealer who sold them to the Poe Museum. A quick look at the surface of the paintings tells us a little of what happened to them over the years. The paintings were done with oil paint on canvas. The canvas was then nailed to a wooden frame called a stretcher. Then they were installed in frames to protect them. At some point, both canvases were removed from their stretchers and frames and rolled up to make them easier to transport. This left a series of horizontal cracks in the paint surface. You can see some of those cracks in this picture. Some of the cracks are difficult to see because a restorer painted them the same color as the surrounding paint. [caption id="attachment_3263" align="alignright" width="600"]Horizontal cracks in Rufus Griswold painting Horizontal cracks in Rufus Griswold painting[/caption] When the paintings were attached to new stretchers, somebody decided to make them narrower, so he or she attached them to smaller stretchers and rolled the excess canvas around the side of the stretcher bar. Bare canvas along the bottom of Caroline’s portrait shows that the person who performed this procedure had trouble lining up the canvas on the new stretcher. Since they could not stretch Rufus’s canvas around the bottom edge of his stretcher, they just nailed the canvas through the front. That’s right. There is a nail sticking out of the picture. You can almost see it in this picture. [caption id="attachment_3262" align="alignright" width="600"]Lower edge of Rufus Griswold portrait Lower edge of Rufus Griswold portrait[/caption] You might also notice a slight bulge in the lower edge of the canvas in that picture. The bulge was caused by the accumulation of junk between the back of the canvas and the front of the stretcher. The conservator found leaves, dust, and dead insects back there. Then people smoked in front of the pictures, and the smoke gradually deposited on the surface of the paintings. Fortunately, the paintings had been varnished shortly after they were painted, so the smoke particles stuck to the varnish instead of adhering to the paint. Eventually, the varnish looked dull and brown from all the smoke and dust stuck to it, so somebody applied another layer of varnish on top of the first varnish. Naturally, more tobacco smoke and dust stuck to that layer. By this time, the painting was so dark it was difficult to see, but it is still down there underneath all that dirty varnish. The conservator wanted to find out what the paint looks like under the varnish, so he used solvents to remove the tobacco smoke, dust, what appears to be some kind of liquid spilled on the surface, and both layers of varnish. The photos below show what he found. 4 3 5 Next time, we will post the conservator’s analysis of the paintings and what he thinks he can do for them.
Comments
Post has no comments.
Post a Comment




Captcha Image

Trackback Link
http://www.poemuseum.org/BlogRetrieve.aspx?BlogID=21606&PostID=885708&A=Trackback
Trackbacks
Post has no trackbacks.