Museum News


August Unhappy Hour Preview


Our August Unhappy Hour, based on Poe’s 1841 tale “A Descent Into The Maelstrom”, is just a few hours away.

In keeping with the nautical nature of Poe’s tale, we will be treated to sea shanties by Bob Zentz.

Here is a bit more info about him (lifted from his bio – you can read the whole thing on his website:

Over the years, Bob participated in many folk ventures, near and far. He began teaching folk music classes in Old Dominion University‚Äôs Rainbow Program in 1971; he created and ran the “Old Dominion Folk Festival” from 1972-81; and became a fixture at the Virginia State Fair beginning in 1980, appearing for his 28th year consecutive year as resident performer in the Heritage Village in October 2009. He appeared on PBS’s long-running program “A Prairie Home Companion” in 1982, and crewed and performed aboard Pete Seeger’s Hudson River sloop “Clearwater,” helping to repair the Hudson River and spreading the word about preserving our waterways, from 1989-91. Bob’s recording of his composition, “Horizons,” was selected in 2006 to be on a tribute to environmental author and pioneer Rachel Carson on the centenary of her birth, entitled “Songs for the Earth.”

Bob has also represented America and its folk traditions far and wide. He represented the U.S. in Shanty Tour, Finland, in 1997, and was an instructor at the inaugural Common Ground, Scotland, in 2002. He performed at the Scottish National Folk Festival in 2002, was featured U.S. artist at the Australian National Folk Festival in Canberra in 2004, and performed that same year in Auckland and Wellington for the New Zealand Maritime Museums. A featured performer at the 2004 Smithsonian Folklife Festival, Bob is also a regular member of the faculty each summer at Common Ground on the Hill, held at McDaniel College in Westminster, Maryland.

Local accolades in the Hampton Roads area include the 1992 John Sears Award for Community Service from Festevents and the City of Norfolk. He created the program, “Life of the 19th Century Mariner” for the Mariners Museum in Newport News in 1995; composed and performed “(Ode to the) Schooner Virginia” at the keel-laying ceremony in 2002 and launching ceremony in 2004; and was music consultant and performer for the multimedia theater experience, “Chesapeake Celebration” in 2004. He was a founding member of the Outer Banks Opry in 2003; received a grant from the Chesapeake Bay Foundation in 2004 to present “Music of the Chesapeake” in Virginia Schools; and was profiled by Public Television’s “Virginia Currents” in 2003 for recognition of his many contributions to music and the community, at home and abroad.

Here is a clip of Mr. Zentz in action at the 2009 Richmond Folk Festival:

So what is a “sea shanty”, you ask? Well, sea shanties were work songs created and sung by sailors. In the days when most of the work on a ship required muscle power, these songs helped to synchronize sailors’ movements as they toiled at repetitive tasks. They also would have been useful to relieve the boredom that one might experience during long sea voyages. The word “shanty” actually derives from the French word “chanter” which means “to sing.”

Come on out from 6-9pm tomorrow night (August 25th) and get into the nautical spirit. As always, Unhappy Hour is free and open to the public. There will be free nibbles and a cash bar as well as fun activities.




Coming Soon: A Descent into the Maelstrom


On Thursday, August 25 from 6-9 P.M. the Poe Museum will pay tribute to Poe’s thrilling adventure tale “A Descent into the Maelstrom” with an evening of sea shanties by renowned folk singer Bob Zentz as well as exhibits, games, and refreshments. Admission is free, but donations are accepted. A cash bar will be available.

“A Descent into the Maelstrom” is the story of a sailor whose ship is trapped in a giant whirlpool. The story was first printed in the May 1841 issue of Grahams Magazine, the same publication that had published “The Murders in the Rue Morgue” a month earlier. At the time of its publication, a reviewer for the Aristidean wrote the story was “noted for the boldness of its subject–a subject never dreamed of before…” Poe’s story was so realistic that some readers thought it was a true story, and a passage from the story was reprinted as fact in the ninth edition of Encyclopedia Britannica. The story was reprinted in Poe’s 1845 collection Tales of Edgar A. Poe. By the next year it had been translated into French and German. It remains one of Poe’s most popular tales and has been compared with both his detective stories and his science fiction. In 1869, Jules Verne, a devotee of Poe’s works, included the Maelstrom in his novel 20,000 Leagues Under the Sea by having Captain Nemo attempt suicide by sending his submarine into the whirlpool.




Cask of Amontillado Unhappy Hour


The theme for our July Unhappy Hour centered on Poe’s classic tale of wine and revenge, “The Cask Of Amontillado”. Since Poe’s tale is set in Italy during “the supreme madness of the Carnival season,” we decided to celebrate with a little carnival of our own in the Enchanted Garden.

It was a very hot and humid night, but we had lots of wonderful folks brave the heat to enjoy the festivities anyway and it was well worth the effort.

Local band Beggars of Life provided the perfect musical accompaniment to the evening. Here is a video of Lulu, Phineas Figg and Stinky Patterson in action in front of the Poe Shrine (video courtesy of Jason Morris):

In addition to our usual food and cash bar, we had many wonderful activities including:

* A Fortune Teller – the fabulous Madame Stephania who gave tarot readings to all who crossed her palm with silver (or carnival tickets)

Madame Stephania in action

* People also had the opportunity to make their own carnival masks or get their faces painted

Showing of a newly finished mask at Unhappy HourCarnivale Mask Making at Unhappy Hour

Carnival Masks

Face painting at Unhappy HourFace painting at the Poe Museum

Face Painting

* Thanks to the lovely Heather from The Wine Seller – people even had a chance to participate in an Amontillado tasting. They also got to learn how much wine is actually in a “pipe” of amontillado (130 gallons or 656 bottles of wine) and did NOT have to worry about getting walled up in a basement to do so!

Amontillado tasting at Unhappy Hour

Amontillado tasting fun

* We also had many carnival games including a chance to dig for buried treasure, coffin races, a black cat ring toss and a Wheel of MISfortune (this is a Poe-themed event, after all).

Treasure Hunt game at Unhappy Hour

Treasure hunting

DSC00835

Black cat ring toss sign

Kate at the ready with Coffin Racing Fun at Unhappy Hour

Coffin race track at the ready!

Some people even wore their own masks to the event!

Carnival Masks!

Awesome carnival masks

People really got into the Carnival spirit and had a great time in the middle of July.
This carnival looks like it may become an annual event – so keep an eye out for it next year.

If you’d like to see more pictures from the event, check out the Poe Museum’s flickr group here: http://www.flickr.com/groups/poemuseum/.

There is also VIDEO of the festivities on the Poe Museum’s very own YouTube Channel: http://www.youtube.com/user/PoeMuseum?feature=mhee#p/u/1/9EYcSkZ2qlo. Check it out and subscribe as more videos will be posted soon! (Maybe even a few from past events!)

And get ready for our next Unhappy Hour, which is coming up on August 25th. The theme will be based on Poe’s “A Descent into the Maelstrom” and will feature sea shanties with Bob Zentz and other nautical activities.




“The Pit and The Pendulum” – June Unhappy Hour


June’s Unhappy Hour (which took place on June 23rd) featured Poe’s short story “The Pit and the Pendulum”. First published in October 1842, the story is a hair raising tale of a prisoner’s experiences at the hands of the Spanish Inquisition and is notable for evoking terror through its heavy reliance on sensory details to emphasize the reality of the narrator’s harrowing situation.

The museum has put together a new exhibit based on Poe’s tale that opened for the Unhappy Hour.
Here is a small sampling courtesy of Keith Kaufelt:

Pit and the Pendulum exhibit at the Poe Museum

You’ll have to come experience the whole exhibit for yourself – it will be here through the end of August.

Unhappy Hour featured a Spanish Inquisition themed scavenger hunt as well as Spanish themed food in honor of the story. Jamie and Katie, two of our lovely staff members, even volunteered to make pendulum cookies for the occasion.
Marvel at their hard work!

Shiny Pendulum Cookies

Pendulum cookies – with “bloody” sprinkle edges courtesy of Jamie and Katie

Family enjoying our Spanish Inquisition trivia game at Unhappy Hour

Family enjoying the Spanish Inquisition scavenger hunt at Unhappy Hour

Lovely Spanish guitar music was provided by the Robinson Guitar Duo.

The Robinson Guitar Duo

The Robinson Guitar Duo

Enjoying Unhappy Hour

Guests enjoying June’s Unhappy Hour festivities

Lots more Unhappy Hour photos (plus larger versions of the ones posted in this entry) may be found here: http://flic.kr/s/aHsjvg7uxN.

Unless you’re a victim of the Inqusition, a good time can always be had during Unhappy Hour at the Poe Museum.

Next Unhappy Hour will be on July 28th from 6pm-9pm and will feature a carnival and an amontillado tasting in honor of “The Cask of Amontillado.” Beggars of Life will provide the evening’s musical entertainment.

You might have so much fun you’ll never leave …




Poe’s Mother visits Unhappy Hour


Eliza Poe performing

Mrs. Poe regaling Unhappy Hour visitors with tales about her life as an actress.

May’s Unhappy Hour was graced by the presence of Poe’s mother,Eliza Poe (as portrayed by Debbie Phillips). Mrs. Poe met and mingled with visitors to the Unhappy Hour event and regaled her audience with stories of her life as an actress in the early 1800s. She even favored us with a few songs that she made famous in her day.

Elizabeth “Eliza” Arnold Hopkins Poe was born in England in 1787 into a family of actors. By 1796, her father had died, so she and her mother Elizabeth Arnold journeyed to America. Eliza made her acting debut on the Boston stage at the age of nine and was a working actress until her death in 1811. She was a talented comedienne, singer and dancer and described as having a “sweetly melodious voice” in reviews. She played at least 200 different roles during her lifetime. She married David Poe, Jr. in 1806. Mr. Poe tried his hand at acting as well, but was not anywhere near as beloved a stage presence as his wife. This may have proved to be a source of friction in their marriage and Poe appears to have abandoned Eliza and their three small children (William Henry Leonard Poe, born in January 1807; Edgar Poe born January 19, 1809; and Rosalie Poe, born in December 1810) sometime in the first half of 1811. By October of 1811, Eliza was showing signs of tuberculosis and had to stop performing and she died on the 8th of December 1811. She is buried in the churchyard at St. John’s Church here in Richmond (five blocks east of the Poe Museum).

Though he was very small at the time of her death, Eliza seems to have been a big influence on her son Edgar. She was, in fact, the first of the important women in Poe’s life to die young. Poe stated that the “death of a beautiful woman is, unquestionably, the most poetical topic in the world, ” and this is certainly a theme that crops up frequently in his work.

The Poe Museum was fortunate to have Eliza Poe portrayed so ably by living history actress, Debbie Phillips from Richmond Discoveries. We were also fortunate to have wonderful music provided by local flautists, Stacie Snyder and Linda Simmons.

Flautists in the Poe Shrine

Flautists Linda Simmons and Stacie Snyder making beautiful music in the Poe Shrine during the event.

Unhappy Hour Guests

Visitors enjoying the Unhappy Hour festivities

Lots more photos of the evening’s events can be found here: http://www.flickr.com/photos/rigbymel/sets/72157626694842209/.
You can share your own photos from Unhappy Hour or your visit to the Poe Museum on the museum’s flickr photo sharing group – http://www.flickr.com/groups/poemuseum.

Our next Unhappy Hour will take place on June 23rd and will feature Poe’s story “The Pit & The Pendulum”, even in the 21st century, it is never too late to fear the Spanish Inquisition. (Besides, nobody expects the Spanish Inqusition!)




Vincent Price’s Birthday Cake


Vincent Price will be turning 100 on May 27, so the Poe Museum will celebrate his birthday with cake and a special display of memorabilia from some of Price’s eleven films based on Poe’s works. Here is a photo of Vincent Price’s birthday cake to be served at the May 26 Unhappy Hour.




Debbie Phillips as Eliza Poe


Debbie Phillips as Edgar Allan Poe's Mother

See Debbie Phillips portray Poe's Mother at the Poe Museum.

Here is a photograph of Debbie Phillips portraying Eliza Poe for the May 26 UNhappy Hour.




It was a dark and stormy night …


Our first Unhappy Hour of the season took place on April the 28th.
Since April marked the 170th anniversary of the publication of the first modern detective story, Poe’s “The Murders in the Rue Morgue”, we had a murder mystery of our own that Unhappy Hour participants could help to solve.

The suspects included characters from various Poe tales that had been brought together so that their creator could announce which of them was to have further adventures in a “new” tale from the esteemed Mr. Poe. This seems to have provided some motivation for the characters in question to want to bump off the competition.

Rogue's Gallery

Our rogue’s gallery gathered around the bust of Poe in the Poe Shrine (from left to right, you can see Fortunato, Marie Roget, Madeline Usher, Eddy, Berenice, C. Auguste Dupin and Jupiter)

There are lots more photos of the proceedings to be found here: http://www.flickr.com/photos/rigbymel/sets/72157626515257025/.
If anyone else took photos that they’d like to share, you can post them yourself on the Poe Museum’s flickr group or you can email them to us at info@poemuseum.org. We love visitor photos!

Appropriately enough, the mayhem of the evening opened with a crack of thunder and an impressive thunderstorm that only lasted for a little while but frightened away a few of our less intrepid Unhappy Hour participants. Thankfully, the majority of our guests proved to be hardy souls who wanted to stick it out and find out who was responsible for the nefarious crime.

We were even rewarded with a lovely rainbow just after the storm passed over!

Music was provided by the fabulous Jack Winn Duo.

As always, there were free nibbles and a cash bar.

And a good time was had by all!
Thanks to all who came out and stuck with us … we hope to see you again at future museum events!

We hope to see you again for our next Unhappy Hour, which will be taking place on Thursday, May 26th – we will be celebrating Poe’s Mother’s Day with a visit from the late Eliza Poe herself. It will be an unforgettable evening, so mark your calendar!