Museum News

Poe Museum Presents Major New Poe Film


This Halloween night at 6 p.m. the Edgar Allan Poe Museum in Richmond, Virginia will premiere the new animated Poe adaptation Extraordinary Tales featuring the voice talents of film legends Christopher Lee (in one of his very last roles), Roger Corman (director of series of Poe films), Guillermo del Toro (director of Crimson Peak and Pan’s Labyrinth) and Bela Lugosi (the original Dracula from the 1931 film of that name). The film, directed by Raul Garcia, features adaptations of five of Poe’s greatest short stories. Click here to see a preview of the film.

Admission is just five dollars. The film will be shown on the big inflatable screen in the Poe Museum’s legendary Enchanted Garden. For more information, please call the Poe Museum at 804.648.5523 or [email protected]


Nobody Does Halloween Like the Poe Museum


Halloween just isn’t Halloween without Edgar Allan Poe. In addition to inventing the detective story and revolutionizing science fiction, Poe developed the modern tale of psychological terror. Readings of “The Tell-Tale Heart” and screenings of the countless screen adaptations of Poe’s works are staples of the Halloween season—guaranteed to send shivers down your spine. This October, the Edgar Allan Poe Museum in Richmond is the place to get your Poe fix with a selection of events for the whole family. Here is a schedule.

October 9 at 5:30 p.m. at the Poe Museum, Richmond
Richmond Strange Stories Walking Tour
See the forgotten places and meet the overlooked people who represent the dark side of Richmond history. This week’s tour will visit Church Hill where you will learn about “Crazy Bette” Van Lew, George Wythe, and Poe’s first love. Click here for more information.

Bowman Body Hosts House on Haunted Hill and City of the Dead
October 10 at noon at the Byrd Theatre in Richmond
The Bowman Body, legendary horror movie host from Channel 8’s Shock Theater, will host an afternoon of classic horror featuring House on Haunted Hill and City of the Dead. One dollar from each ticket sold will go to support the Poe Museum’s educational programs. Click here for more information.

Richmond Strange Stories Walking Tour
October 16 at 5:30 p.m. at the Poe Museum, Richmond

Follow Richmond’s historic canal to learn the role it played in making Richmond the center of weirdness it is today. Click here for more information. Click here for more information.

Fancy Me Mad
October 17 at 6:30 p.m. at St. John’s Church, Richmond
Join us for a walking tour of the graveyard, meet some of our most famous spirits, and then join Edgar Allan Poe in the church for ghostly tales.
Among the spirits represented: Edgar’s mother Eliza Poe, George Wythe and his murderous nephew, Daniel Denoon, who shares the story of his death at the hands of his employer James McNaught, and hear from a Confederate Soldier looking for Union spy Elizabeth Van Lew.
The cost is $5. You may pay at the gate or purchase advance tickets at or go to and search Fancy Me Mad
5:00 pm Gates open for self-guided tour
6:00 pm Church doors open and music begins seating is first come, first served basis
6:30 pm Poe tells stories in the church
The Visitor Center will be open for shopping featuring items from The Poe Museum and St. John’s Church – and serving refreshments.
Click here for more information.

October Unhappy Hour: “The Cask of Amontillado”
October 22 from 6-9 p.m. at the Poe Museum, Richmond
Join us in the Poe Museum’s Enchanted Garden for the final Unhappy Hour of the year. This is also the spookiest one of the season and will feature live music by Connor Wood, a cash bar, food, and performances. Halloween costumes are encouraged, although not required! The theme for this Unhappy Hour is Poe’s story “The Cask of Amontillado.” Cost: $5 Click here to see photos from our Unhappy Hour Poe Photo Booth.

Exhibit: The Cask of Amontillado
October 22 at the Poe Museum, Richmond

Poe’s classic comes to life as you learn the story behind the story in this chilling exhibit.

Richmond Strange Stories Walking Tour
October 23 at 5:30 p.m. at the Poe Museum, Richmond
Learn the dark history of Capitol Square. Click here for more information.

Poe Alive! The Cask of Amontillado
October 23 at 8 p.m. at the Poe Museum, Richmond
The entire Poe Museum garden becomes the stage, and the audience must travel through it to experience this unique interpretation of Poe’s classic horror story “The Cask of Amontillado” presented by Free Jambalaya. Click here for more information.

Richmond’s Strange Stories Walking Tour
October 30 at 5:30 p.m. at the Poe Museum, Richmond
Catch the last Strange Stories walking tour of 2015. Click here for more information.

Poe Alive! The Cask of Amontillado
October 30 at 8 p.m. at the Poe Museum, Richmond

The entire Poe Museum garden becomes the stage, and the audience must travel through it to experience this unique interpretation of Poe’s classic horror story “The Cask of Amontillado” presented by Free Jambalaya. Click here for more information.

Poe’s Pumpkin Patch
October 31 from noon to 4 p.m. at the Poe Museum, Richmond

Make sure your kids grow up weird by taking them to this fun-filled afternoon of Poe-themed games and crafts. Included with Poe Museum admission.

Poe Goes to the Movies: Extraordinary Tales
October 31 from 6 to 9 p.m. at the Poe Museum, Richmond
See the Richmond premiere of the new animated Poe adaptation featuring the voice talents of the legendary Christopher Lee, Roger Corman, and Bela Lugosi. Admission is $5. Here is the preview. Click here for more information.

Poe Alive! The Cask of Amontillado
November 1 at 8 p.m. at the Poe Museum, Richmond

The entire Poe Museum garden becomes the stage, and the audience must travel through it to experience this unique interpretation of Poe’s classic horror story “The Cask of Amontillado” presented by Free Jambalaya. Click here for more information.

Beloved Horror Host Returns to Support Poe Museum


On October 10 at the Byrd Theater in Richmond VA, fans of legendary horror movie host, the Bowman Body, will have a unique opportunity to see both newly shot footage and surviving footage from the popular local show “Shock Theatre” and help a worthy cause at the same time.

Director Sean Kotz of Horse Archer Productions produced new episodes of Shock Theater in August featuring an upgraded set, familiar characters and Colonial Heights’ own Bill Bowman as the Bowman Body. The episodes are wrapped around two classic horror films, “House on Haunted Hill” and “City of the Dead” and available on DVD but Kotz said he wanted to provide something very special for the longtime fans.

“Back in 2011, we did a documentary on the Bowman Body called ‘Hi There Horror Movie Fans’ and tracked down the surviving footage from the WXEX days,” Kotz stated, “but we cut up most of the footage for the documentary leaving a lot of it unseen by the fans.”

“So we decided to put together something we are calling, ‘Them’s the Breaks, Bowman Body’ that lets folks see what remains of the old show’s breaks as well as what Bowman is doing now.”

Fans can expect to see the Bowman Body clowning with guests, playing his ukulele and the famous “basketball incident” in which Bowman was accidentally knocked out of his trademark coffin by a wayward basketball. Other rarities and bloopers will be part of the show too and Bill Bowman will be in attendance.

Tickets are $10 at the door and one dollar of every sale goes to the Poe Museum to help support its educational outreach programs.

Afterward, fans wanting to meet Bill Bowman in person are invited to a public party at The Bucket Trade in Chester at 5 pm on the 10th where they can sample special Bowman inspired brews from Isley Brewing, get autographs and check out the new DVDs.

More information is available at


Edgar Allan Poe Comes to Life this October


The Poe Museum and St. John’s Church have teamed up to bring Edgar Allan Poe back to life in the very place he often came to visit his beloved mother’s grave. Join us on Saturday, October 17 at 5 p.m. at St. John’s Church at 2401 East Broad Street in Richmond, Virginia for a walking tour of the historic graveyard where you will meet some of our most famous spirit before you join Edgar Allan Poe in the church for a performance of some of his ghostly tales. Among the spirits represented are Edgar’s mother Eliza Poe, George Wythe and his murderous nephew, Daniel Denoon and his killer James McNaught, and a Confederate Soldier looking for Union spy Elizabeth Van Lew.

The cost is $5. You may pay at the gate or purchase advance tickets here or go to and search Fancy Me Mad.

Fancy Me Mad – Tales from Edgar Allan Poe and Graveyard Tours
Saturday, October 17, 2016
5:00 – 7:00 PM
St. John’s Church
2401 E. Broad Street
Richmond VA 23223

Sponsored by: St. John’s Church Foundation and The Poe Museum

5:00 p.m. Gates open for self-guided tour
6:00 p.m. Church doors open and music begins seating is first come, first served basis
6:30 p.m. Poe tells stories in the church

(The Visitor Center will be open for shopping featuring items from The Poe Museum and St. John’s Church – and serving refreshments.)


Experience Poe’s Classic Chiller in a Whole New Way


On October 23 and 30 at 8 p.m. at the Poe Museum in Richmond, Virginia, Free Jambalaya will present a new interpretation of Poe’s terror classic “The Cask of Amontillado.” The audience will follow the actors through the Museum’s garden in this unique performance. Tickets are $15 and are available at the Poe Museum.

The piece will be directed by Rebecca Anne Muhleman and will feature Freddy Kaufman, Dean Knight, Katy McCormack, and Lesie Pumphrey.


Poe Museum’s Object of the Month May Hold Clue to Poe’s Mysterious Death

It is one of the stars of the Poe Museum. It has traveled the world and encountered both a U.S. president and the Queen of England. Millions of people, in fact, have seen this simple wooden walking stick. Millions more have read about it in various biographies and novels about Poe.

About thirty-six inches long, the cane is made of dark wood with a silver tip inscribed “Poe.” A hole through the shaft once held a leather strap the user would loop around the user’s wrist. This humble piece is remarkable not only because it was once owned by Edgar Allan Poe but because it might be a clue to Poe’s mysterious death.


The first recorded mention of Poe’s walking stick is in a March 1878 article entitled “The Last Days of Edgar Allan Poe” by Susan Weiss in Scribner’s Magazine. Weiss reports that, on Poe’s last night in Richmond before his ill-fated trip to Baltimore on his way to Philadelphia, he visited the home of his friend Dr. John Carter at Seventeenth and Broad Streets in Richmond. “Late in the evening he entered the office of Dr. John Carter, and spent an hour in looking over the day’s papers; then taking Dr. Carter’s cane he went out, remarking that he would step across to Saddler’s (a fashionable restaurant) and get supper. From the circumstance of his taking the cane, leaving his own in its place, it is probable that he had intended to return; but at the restaurant he met with some acquaintances who detained him until late, and then accompanied him to the Baltimore boat.”

Dr. John Carter

Dr. John Carter

Dr. Carter wrote his own account of his evening with Poe in the November 1902 issue of Lippincott’s Monthly Magazine.

I had not seen Poe for some days, when he one evening, about half-past nine o’clock, called at my office, which, being on Seventeenth and Broad Streets, had afforded him a half-way resting-place between Duncan Lodge and the residence of Mrs. Shelton, on Church Hill, during his brief engagement to that lady. As was well known to his intimate friends, the engagement was broken off before he left Richmond, though whether afterwards resumed is not certain. On this evening he sat for some time talking, while playing with a handsome Malacca sword-cane recently presented me by a friend, and then, abruptly rising, said, “I think I will step over to Saddler’s (a popular restaurant in the neighborhood) for a few moments,” and so left without any further word, having my cane still in his hand. From this manner of departure I inferred that he expected to return shortly, but did not see him again, and was surprised to learn next day that he had left for Baltimore by the early morning boat. I then called on Saddler, who informed me that Poe had left his house at exactly twelve that night, starting for the Baltimore boat in company with several companions whom he had met at Saddler’s, and giving as a reason there for the lateness of the hour and the fact that the boat was to leave at four o’clock. According to Saddler he was in good spirits and sober, though it is certain that he had been drinking and that he seemed oblivious of his baggage, which had been left in his room at the Swan Tavern. These effects were after his death forwarded by one of Mrs. Mackenzie’s sons to Mrs. Clemm in New York, and through the same source I received my cane, which Poe in his absent-mindedness had taken away with him.

After leaving Richmond, Poe’s disappeared for five days before being found semi-conscious at a Baltimore polling place on an election day. He had no memory of his whereabouts, and the appearance of his cheap, ill-fitting clothes suggested his own expensive clothes had been stolen. Poe spent the next four days in a hospital, but his attending physician John J. Moran was unable to determine what had happened to the poet or his clothing. Rumors spread that he had been beaten, robbed, or cooped (the practice of abducting and drugging a stranger in order to drag them from one polling place to the next to vote multiple times). Even Poe’s cause of death is open to speculation, and historians have theorized he could have been suffering from meningitis, rabies, or any number of other diseases.

In 1907, Susan Weiss wrote about the walking stick again in her book The Home Life of Poe. This time, she embellished her account by saying that Poe was carried to a Baltimore hospital with Carter’s Malacca cane in his hand, even though this seems to be contradicted by Carter’s version of the story.

Susan Archer Talley Weiss

Susan Archer Talley Weiss

While Dr. Carter was sure to recover his own cane from the Mackenzies after Poe’s death, he did not bother to return Poe’s walking stick to the poet’s family. Instead, Carter kept it as memento of his famous friend.

When Carter’s health declined in his later years, his cousin William Henry Booker took Carter into his home. Booker inherited the walking stick after Carter’s death. Booker’s daughter, Mrs. Mary Harnish, (b. 1874) then inherited the stick along with the rest of Booker’s possessions.

In 1923, Mrs. Catherine Campbell, custodian of the newly formed Poe Museum in Richmond, borrowed the walking stick to display at the museum. Three years later, the museum contacted Mrs. Harnish about the possibility of purchasing the piece. Harnish wrote back to say she would need $250 for it and that they should reply soon because she was fielding other offers for the artifact. Always short of funds, the museum could not afford what would have been the equivalent of $3,280 in today’s dollars.

Mrs. Archer Jones

Mrs. Archer Jones

At about this time, tragedy struck when one of the Poe Museum’s founders, Archer Jones, committed suicide. His devastated widow Annie Boyd Jones bought the walking stick and presented to the Poe Museum in memory of her husband.

The same year it entered the Poe Museum’s collection, Poe’s walking stick was mentioned in Poe biographies by Mary Phillips and Hervey Allen. In his 1941 biography of Poe, Arthur Hobson Quinn also retold the story of Poe mistakenly taking Carter’s walking stick. This seemingly humble piece of wood was quickly becoming one of the museum’s main attractions.

Walking Stick in Display Case in 1927

Walking Stick in Display Case in 1927

In 1945, William J. Burtscher wrote in his book The Romance Behind Walking Canes that “this cane could claim that it was often held by the hand that wrote “The Raven,” “The Bells,” and “Ulalume,”—and that was the only hand of all poets of all time that could have written these, and some other, Poesquian mysteries.” Burtscher believed “Richmond, indeed, is the logical place for the cane to rest, for Poe himself left it there.” The cane, however, would soon leave Richmond.

In 1957, Virginia celebrated the 350th anniversary of the founding of Jamestown, the first permanent English settlement in the New World. In honor of the occasion, the Virginia 350th Anniversary Commission opened the Jamestown Festival featuring a reconstruction of the original 1607 Jamestown settlement, recreations of the ships that carried the colonists to Jamestown, and a large exhibit of Virginia history. Among the 1.5 million visitors to the festival were the Queen of England and Vice President Richard Nixon. The walking stick was such a popular attraction that the Jamestown Festival Park requested an extension of the loan through 1959. The can did not return to Richmond until 1960 when the Poe Museum’s board finally decided not to renew the loan.

Poe's Walking Stick

Poe’s Walking Stick

In 1999 the walking stick crossed the ocean for the first time when the Poe Society of Prague borrowed it for an exhibition at the First International Poe Festival. Because the Poe Museum deemed the cane too valuable to ship to Prague, Poe Museum trustee Welford Dunaway Taylor carried it with him to the festival. The walking stick would not travel again until 2014 when the Grolier Club in New York borrowed it for the exhibit The Persistence of Poe. Once again, a Poe Museum representative personally delivered and retrieved the item.

Part of the interest in this piece is its connection with Poe’s final days. Authors and researchers have speculated that the fever and the confused state that may have caused Poe to mistake his walking stick for Carter’s could be a symptoms of the still unidentified illness that would end Poe’s life a little more than a week later. Others have wondered if Poe took Carter’s sword cane because he wanted a weapon with which to defend himself on his trip to Philadelphia. The latter seems unlikely if Poe left the walking stick in Richmond, as Carter’s account implies. In his novel about Poe’s death, The Poe Shadow, Matthew Pearl explores the mystery of the switched walking sticks. Believing Poe still had Carter’s Malacca cane with him when he was found wearing someone else’s clothes in Baltimore, the novel’s detective Duponte speculates Poe was not robbed of his clothing because the thieves would have also stolen the fine Malacca cane in the process.

Poe admirers and actors portraying Poe have created replicas of the famous cane, and it has appeared in numerous books and articles. To this day, it remains one of the stars of the Poe Museum’s collection. That is why it is the museum’s Object of the Month for September 2015.

This month marks the 166th anniversary of the night Poe left his walking stick at Dr. Carter’s house just days before his death. That walking stick is now on display just six blocks from where that house once stood. You can see Poe’s walking stick the Poe Museum’s Elizabeth Arnold Poe Memorial Building alongside Poe’s vest and boot hooks.

Poe Museum Exhibit Examines One of Mankind’s Greatest Fears

To be buried while alive is, beyond question, the most terrific of these extremes which has ever fallen to the lot of mere mortality.
~Edgar A. Poe, “The Premature Burial”

"The Premature Burial" by Harry Clarke

“The Premature Burial” by Harry Clarke

From August 27 until October 18, 2015, the Edgar Allan Poe Museum in Richmond will host Buried Alive, an exhibit exploring the theme of premature burial in Poe’s works. Poe called the subject of being buried alive, “the most terrific of these extremes which has ever fallen to the lot of mere mortality.” Characters are entombed alive in Poe’s tales “Berenice,” “The Premature Burial,” “Loss of Breath,” “The Cask of Amontillado,” and “The Fall of the House of Usher.”


When searching for explanations for Poe’s repeated use of the theme in his works, one needs look no further than the newspapers of his day. At a time when many people died at home without a doctor present, people in a cataleptic state could be mistaken for dead and accidentally buried—or almost buried. Sometimes such people awoke while the first few shovels of dirt were thrown over their coffin. Others awoke on medical school dissecting tables. Articles about real cases of premature burial abounded in the press of the day, and certain readers grew so terrified of being buried alive that they purchased “safety coffins” in which an accidentally buried person could ring a bell to alert passersby to rescue him in the event he woke up six feet underground. While several designs for such coffins were devised, there is no record of anyone being rescued from one of them. Eventually, some concerned citizens formed The Society for the Prevention of People Being Buried Alive. Among other ideas, this organization proposed a law that would prevent burial of people until they started to “smell dead.”


The Poe Museum’s Buried Alive exhibit will feature rare first printings and the only surviving portion of “The Premature Burial” in Poe’s own handwriting. When visiting the gallery, be sure to try out the life-size coffin in which you can have your picture taken. We promise not to bury you in it.


Richmond’s Strange Stories Reveal the Hidden History of Poe’s Hometown

What mysteries are lurking in your own backyard? What made Richmond the weird place we know and love? Why would anybody ride a sturgeon?

From May 29 until October 30, 2015, the Edgar Allan Poe Museum in Richmond and Richmond Discoveries will be teaming up to offer Richmond’s Strange Stories, a series of neighborhood walking tours profiling Richmond’s hidden history—the weird people and bizarre (but true) events from history that made Richmond what it is today. The tours meet at the Poe Museum at 1914 East Main Street at 5:30 and last until 7 p.m. Three different tours will be offered: Capitol District (May 29, June 19, July 10, July 31, August 21, September 11, October 2, & October 23), Church Hill (June 5, June 26, July 17, August 7, August 28, September 18, October 9, & October 30), and Shockoe and the River (May 22, June 12, July 3, July 24, August 14, September 4, September 25, & October 16). These fascinating tours will be fun for adults and children eight and older. The price is $12 for adults and $10 for senior citizens and military personnel, $6 for Poe Museum members, and $6 for children under twelve. Preregistration is required, and tickets can be purchased through the Richmond Discoveries website, by calling (804) 222-8595 OR (804) 648-5523, or in person at the Edgar Allan Poe Museum. Click here to book today.

Poet Premieres New Work at Poe Museum

On Thursday, June 4 at 6 p.m. at the Poe Museum in Richmond, poet and Penn State University professor Charles Cantalupo will read a unique series of poems inspired by each of the cities in which Edgar Allan Poe lived. In researching the poems, Cantalupo travelled to the cities connected with Poe and searched for evidence of the ways those places inspired Poe as well as the continuing presence of Poe in each location. After years of research and writing, Cantalupo will perform the entire series for the first time. This thrilling performance will blend sound and rhythm with the poet’s own unique take on each of the cities featured.

As Edgar Allan Poe’s hometown, Richmond is the subject of one of the poems. Cantalupo visited Richmond and the Poe Museum last year and incorporated the city’s people and places, including Shockoe Slip and Linden Row, into the poem. For more information, please contact the Poe Museum at 804-648-5523 or [email protected]

Those coming to see Cantalupo’s performance will also want to hear his wife Barbara Cantalupo, a distinguished Poe scholar, speak about “The Poe You May Not Know” at the Virginia Historical Society earlier the same day at noon on June 4. Click here for more information about her talk.

About Charles Cantalupo
Charles Cantalupo is the author of a series of poems on the cities where Edgar Allan Poe lived throughout his life, called “Poe in Place.” Excerpts have been published in The Edgar Allan Poe Review, Poe’s Pervasive Influence, and The Spirit of Poe. Cantalupo’s reading at The Poe Museum will mark the first time “Poe in Place” has ever been performed in its entirety.

Poet, translator, scholar, and documentary filmmaker, Charles Cantalupo is Distinguished Professor of English, Comparative Literature, and African Studies at The Pennsylvania State University. His literary memoir, Joining Africa – From Anthills to Asmara (2012), won a Next Generation Indie Book Award in 2012. His newest collection of poetry, Where War Was, will be published later this year, and he has published three previous collections: Light the Lights (2004), Anima/l Woman and Other Spirits (1996), and The Art of Hope (1985). He is one of the world’s leading translators of African language poetry. A co-author of the historic Asmara Declaration on African Languages and Literatures, he is the writer and director of Against All Odds, a documentary about poets and poetry in Africa. His work has received major support from the Ford and Rockefeller foundations and the World Bank, and he is also the author of books on Thomas Hobbes, Ngugi wa Thiong’o, and Eritrea.

Poe Museum Opened This Week Ninety-three Years Ago

The Edgar Allan Poe Museum turned ninety-three this week. The above photograph was taken at the opening ceremony, which featured distinguished guests, readings of original Poe letters and manuscripts, and a tea party. Below is the program for the event, which was held on April 26-28, 1922.